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2: Aleister Crowley A hugely prolific author who identified with occultism and formed his own religion, Thelema, Crowley’s central tenet was, “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law.Love is the law, love under will.” 3: Mae West Mae West initially refused to allow her image to appear on the artwork.Those that made the final cut remain a fascinating cross-section of cultures, importance and each individual Beatle’s own interests.To paraphrase the song, you might have known the band for all these years, so here we introduce to you, everyone else that featured on the , which attempted “to show as clearly as possible that there is an essential unity in all religions”, Sri Yukteswar Giri was guru to both Sri Mahavatara Babaji (No.27) and Paramahansa Yogananda (No.33).She was, after all, one of the most famous bombshells from Hollywood’s Golden Age and felt that she would never be in a lonely hearts club.However, after The Beatles personally wrote to her explaining that they were all fans, she agreed to let them use her image.In 1978, Ringo Starr (No.63) returned the favour when he appeared in West’s final movie, 1978’s cover, he had been arrested for obscenity, further making him a countercultural hero not only for The Beatles, but also the Beatniks and Bob Dylan (No.15). 5: Karlheinz Stockhausen A German composer who pioneered the use of electronic music in the 50s and 60s, Stockhausen remains a godfather of the avant-garde, whose boundary-pushing music influenced The Beatles’ own groundbreaking experiments in the studio, starting with their tape experiments of ’s ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’.

15: Bob Dylan Dylan and The Beatles influenced each other throughout the 60s, each spurring the other on to making music that pushed boundaries and reshaped what was thought possible of the simple “pop song”.

17: Sir Robert Peel A founder of the modern Conservative Party, Sir Robert Peel served as the UK’s Prime Minister on two separate occasions, 1834--46.

While he served as the UK’s Home Secretary, Peel also helped form the modern police force – and his name is still evoked today, with the terms “bobbies” and “peelers” referring to policemen in England and Ireland, respectively.

From Paul Mc Cartney’s original concept to the final design, staged by British pop artist Peter Blake and his then wife, Jann Haworth, it’s not just an album cover, but a dazzling display of modern art that defines its era.

Not only a groundbreaking design for the time, the artwork also broke the bank, costing almost £3,000 to create – well over £50,000 in today’s money and more than any other pop album sleeve at that time.

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